Stage One

"JohnnyK" posted a question about using the Direct Mode on StageOne. 

  • When I set my StageOne to stereo direct, is the crossover filter for the subwoofer active or inactive?  I am trying to decide if I should use the crossover in the subwoofer's amp, or the crossover in the StageOne to control the bass that is going to the subwoofer. Any suggestions?

Johnny:

Per the Stage One manual, "The subwoofer, if one is present, is active in Stereo Direct mode; you can turn it off by lowering its channel volume to below –10dB."

The subwoofer is driven, with a crossover, in Stereo Direct mode.  Does yours seem to behave that way?

If you use the same subwoofer for both two-channel and multi-channel listening modes, the Stage One can do the best job of managing the levels since it knows what mode it's in and knows therefore how to set the amount of LF for that particular mode.  In this case, using the Stage One crossover makes sense.  It's also convenient that the level can then be further tweaked within the Stage One, even from the remote.

If you only use this sub only for two-channel (rare that you'd have two subs, but I won't assume), then the sub's crossover might work well since it's internal crossover filtering is optimized for the subs capabilities.  The sub becomes a more integrated part of the overall 2-channel speaker system.

Having said all that, the bottom line performance is hugely impacted by the room.  What seems technically incorrect in terms of crossover points, roll-off rates, etc,...  can actually help "correct" for a given room response.  For example, I've seen situations where setting the LPF for a sub lower than the HPF for the mains (not crossing over at the same frequency point), rather than producing a theoretical "hole" in the response, can actually help compensate for a nasty LF room resonance without the need for an additional EQ.

So, I guess I'm suggesting pick your use case and when all is said and done, stick with what sounds right in your room for the widest variety of sources.  Sometimes theory has to take a back seat (usually because it's an incomplete description, not because it's wrong).

Hope that helps in some way,

Rick